“…when he was young and a journal.”

As a grammaticus, I sometimes get to read lovely little diversions like the following (from a quiz on The Great Gatsby)

———

Q. What did Gatsby’s father show to Nick, and why?

A. Pictures of Gatsby when he was young and a journal. He showed him this, so Nick knew about Gatsby’s early life.

Jay Gatsby when he was young.

Jay Gatsby when he was young.

A journal.

A journal.

———

Q.E.D., right?

I could say something about commas and result clauses, but I don’t want to rob you of the delight you already had in reading those two infelicities.

Here’s another one:

———

Q. Describe, in a few words, Gatsby’s funeral.

A. It was small with only a little people showing up.

It was a little people, but it gave Gatsby its own version of the twenty-one gun salute.

It was a little people, but it gave Gatsby its own version of the twenty-one gun salute.

———

Thanks, dear reader, should you ever find me, for being my gadfly.

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About philokalos

Philologist, historian, and lover of great books, I started this blog to keep myself alert to the beauty of what I see amid the demands of my work.
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